Academic Forum

The Academic Forum is an inclusive and accessible forum that brings together undergraduate and graduate students as well as early career researchers from across the world interested in international economic law issues as they relate to Africa and the Global South. Its goals are to encourage and build core research skills in teaching, research, theory, methods and writing; developing content for Afronomicslaw.org and where possible to encourage authors to submit to the African Journal of International Economic Law; holding workshops and masterclasses on core research skills in teaching, research, theory, methods and writing; and organizing annual poster/essay competitions on international economic law issues. Its convenor is Afronomicslaw.org Editor, Ohio Omiunu. 

Reflections on the 9th Afronomicslaw Academic Forum Guest Lecture Delivered by Harrison Mbori and John Nyanje

The lecture was fascinating because it provided various ways of moving forward. These include the questioning of international law as amateurs, the need to produce ‘African’ international law, and the duty we have in promoting and protecting our epistemic locations.

Reflection Piece on the 8th Lecture of the Afronomicslaw Academic Forum: The AfCFTA in the Shadow of Contending Visions of Pan-Africanism by Prof Olabisi D. Akinkugbe

On Saturday, 10 April 2021, Olabisi D. Akinkugbe delivered the 8th Lecture in the ongoing Guest Lecture Series of the Afronomicslaw Academic Forum. The title of Professor Akinkugbe’s presentation was “The African Continental Free Trade Area in the Shadow of Contending Visions of Pan-Africanism.” The Lecture was based on his forthcoming book chapter entitled “A Critical Appraisal of the African Continental Free Trade Area Agreement.” Prof. Akinkugbe’s main argument was that although the AfCFTA has been referred to as a pan-African trade agreement, it is unclear what that means since pan-Africanism is subject to different interpretations.

Reflection Piece on the 7th Lecture of the Afronomicslaw Academic Forum delivered by Prof Carmen Gonzalez

This blog piece is a reflection on the core arguments from Professor Gonzalez’s lecture. Notably, Professor Gonzalez explored the relationship between environmental degradation and human economic activity. Within this general theme, Professor Gonzalez discussed the link between human economic activity, climate change, capitalism, colonialism and its aftermath, and modernity. This piece will also evaluate Professor Gonzalez’s thoughts on how the actions adopted to combat climate change marginalise the Global South and perpetuate further exploitation of fragile ecosystems across the world. Finally, this piece will outline and analyse Professor Gonzalez’s arguments on the current technological advancements to address climate change and their impact in the Global South.

Call For Regional Representatives For the Afronomicslaw Academic Forum (Eastern Africa) March 2021

Members of the Academic Forum are called ‘Regional Representatives’. There are three major ‘streams’ or ‘departments’ within the Forum; namely, the editorial stream, the partnerships stream and the general Stream. However, and for efficiency purposes, one must first join the general Stream and, where slot later opens up in either of the editorial or partnerships stream, he/she/they may apply for a position in the relevant Stream.

Reflections on the 6th Afronomicslaw Academic Forum Guest Lecture delivered by Professor Mohsen al Attar

This post-lecture reflection captures critical discussions from the 6th guest lecture of the Academic Forum delivered by Professor Mohsen al Attar, Dean of the University of West Indies Law School. The theme of the guest lecture was 'Decolonisation of International Economic Law'. Focusing on five tenets - capitalism, epistemology/knowledge, colonialism, international law and political economy – which Professor Mohsen used as a frame to foreground his analysis, this piece, explores the prospects and challenges of decolonising International Economic Law. In keeping with the Academic Forum's focus, it is argued that uncritical/Eurocentric approaches to teaching IEL in African universities hamper efforts to decolonise our epistemologies. In exploring alternate ways to re-frame, the global economic order, this piece also highlights the idea of 'social justice' as a valuable metric of development, i.e. socio-economic equity that raises the standard of living to the greatest extent relative to each of our circumstances.

Reflections and Testimonials from Academic Forum Participants Class of 2020/2021

Afronomicslaw established the Academic Forum to bring together undergraduate and graduate students as well as early career researchers from across the world interested in international economic law issues as they relate to Africa and the Global South.