International Finance Corporation

News: 3.18.2021

The News and Events published every week include conferences, major developments in the field of International Economic Law in Africa at the national, sub-regional and regional levels as well as relevant case law.

A devida diligência nos instrumentos da OCDE e alguns desafios para sua implementação na América Latina

This contribution delivers an overview of OECD documents that tackle Responsible Business Conduct in general and Due Diligence in particular, sharing some of the author’s views on challenges for implementation of due diligence in Latin America.

Development Projects as Delivery Vehicles for Realizing the Sustainable Development Goals: A Need for Developing Deeper Insights

This contribution starts with two observations, both reflecting mainstream approaches to international economic law, international institutional law and public international law more generally. First, international development law, defined as a branch of International Economic Law (IEL) that sets out “the rights and duties of states and other actors in the development process” seldom receives the same degree of research and teaching focus typically dedicated to branches such as international trade, investment and monetary regulation – as a cursory review of the tables of contents of prominent IEL textbooks and research handbooks illustrates. Second, the same can be said about multilateral development banks (MDBs) and their development-finance operations.

Reforming Private International Law in African Countries: Looking Inward and Outward

This post argues for greater collaboration between African countries and the Conference to ensure the continuing development of private international law on the continent, especially in fields of commercial significance. There are a number of important subject areas such as the enforcement of judgements, choice of law and jurisdiction agreements for which domestic reforms could be inspired by some of the Conference’s work.

Environmental Protection under Bilateral Investment Treaties

Although developing countries are very eager to attract FDI through BITs, for most parts, they deliberately water down the environmental concerns. However, recently we have witnessed the incorporation of environmental standards and provisions in BITs. This ambitious effort however is usually frustrated by decisions of international arbitration tribunals.