International Economic Law

Reflections on Day 2 of the AfIELN Biennial Conference: Covid-19 and International Economic Law: Africa’s Experiences and Responses

It is apparent that the issue of private creditors in relation to African sovereign debt is a ticking timing bomb in Africa. Africa, though rich in minerals, has slow economic growth and a serious debt problem. There is thus a need for a harmonised legal framework that deals with the issue of sovereign debt, set a limit on debt levels, and outlines how debt restructuring should occur. Africa cannot afford to wait for the active buy-in of other multilateral players in order to develop this legal framework; Africa needs to drive this initiative. In addition, both players—being African countries and private creditors—must take responsibility to avoid reckless lending. This can also be addressed in a much-needed comprehensive legal framework.

Reflections on Day 1 of the AfIELN Biennial Conference: COVID-19 and International Economic Law: Africa’s Experiences and Responses

This blog piece is a reflection on the core arguments from this conference. Notably, Prof. Arewa explored the broader relationship between Africa and international law governance. Within this general theme, Prof. Arewa discussed the link between copy-and-paste laws, the relationship between internal and external legal perspectives, the importance of measurement systems, the lack of understanding of our legal systems, and Africa's place in the COVID-19 vaccine struggle. This piece will evaluate Prof. Arewa and other speakers' thoughts on how COVID-19 brought Africa's broader problems into light, as well as the measures that could be taken to pivot for effective African solutions. This piece will specifically outline the speakers' views on the place and benefits of regional integration and the emerging digital economy's benefits to Africa. Finally, the piece will conclude by drawing the recommendations made as a way forward for Africa.

Afronomicslaw.org Academic Forum Introductory Video

The Afronomicslaw.org Academic Forum Video features short introductions in response to five questions. -What is the Academic Forum? -Why is the Academic Forum Needed? -What does the Academic Forum Offer? -What is our mentorship program? -Where does one begin? The video features responses by: -Dr. Ohio Omiunu, Editor - Afronomicslaw.org Academic Forum -Arnold Nciko, Lead Regional Representative, East Africa -Kayode Olude, Lead Regional Representative, West Africa -Nikola Sekoe, Lead Regional Representative, Southern Africa -Anne Mburu, East African Partnerships Lead -Mainga Simoonga, Southern Africa Partnerships Lead.

Webinar: Teaching and Researching International Economic Law in Africa, Strategies for Overcoming Publishing Challenges

July 2, 2021

International economic law is an emerging area of teaching, research, and practice in Africa. The area, which is a sub-field of international law, is concerned with the regulation of economic relations between states as well as the conduct of private parties involved in cross-border economic and business transactions.

International Economic Law and Central Banks in Africa: Toward a Progressive Pro-Development Approach

Africa’s regional central banks, and the projects of monetary coordination and monetary union they oversee, arise directly out of treaty frameworks. These frameworks provide vital opportunities for calibrating these policy objectives in the form of legal and institutional design. The goal must be to ascertain the components of a progressive, pro-development approach that will seek to balance the objective of financial stability with the objective of maintaining sufficient macroeconomic policy space, and the objective of central bank independence with the objective of accountability to the public interest.