Stand-Alone Posts

Category

Material Resources, Human Labour, and Data: The Long-Forgotten Elements of the Digital Economy's True Value Chain and an Indication for its Adequate Taxation

Taxing the digital economy has been on the international tax agenda for almost 30 years, revolving about how to tax an industry increasingly based on intangibles, scale effect, and market reach without a physical presence. But following Crawford and Joler’s concept of extractivism (2020; 2021), the digital economy is not only about BATX or GAFAM, but also about material resources, human labor, and data. The article analyses those long-forgotten elements of the Digital Economy’s true value chain, and, as the most recent two-pillar-based reform of the Inclusive Framework does actively exclude them, how those elements could be considered in the reform process.

Afronomicslaw Academic Forum Guest Lecture Series: Trade Facilitation - The Key to a Borderless Africa

On the 22nd day of May 2021, AfronomicsLaw Academic Forum held a Guest Lecture titled 'Trade Facilitation: The Key to a Borderless Africa'. The esteemed speakers were Dr Tsotang Tsietsi and Mr Craig Merito, who addressed the role of trade facilitation as a mechanism to enhance intra-African trade. Dr Tsietsi, the first speaker, is a Senior Lecturer at the National University of Lesotho. She holds an LLM from the University of Cambridge and a PhD from the University of Cape Town. Mr. Craig Merito is an international trade expert and consultant with over 25 years of experience. This piece will reflect on the issues raised by Dr Tsietsi before proceeding to those encompassed by Mr. Merito.

The Global South and Systemic Imbalances in International Energy Law

In the globalised world that we inhabit, replete with its complex private transnational institutions and multinational corporations, energy law is often far from “national”. That is to say, hard legal problems arising in relation to energy issues within a particular country will often have a remarkably international character that can substantially transcend the immediate jurisdictional confines of the country in question.

African Sovereign Debt Justice Network’s Statement on the Occasion of the 2022 Spring Meetings of the IMF and the World Bank

On the occasion of their 2022 Spring Meetings, the African Sovereign Debt Justice Network (AfSDJN); the Pan-African Lawyers Union, (PALU); the African Forum for Debt and Development (Afrodad); NAWI Afrifem Macroeconomics; the Jesuit Justice Ecology Network Africa, (JENA); the Okoa Uchumi Campaign; and BudgiT call upon the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank to address their unjust governance structures that have roots in the historical subjugation of African countries. African countries did not take part in designing the current international financial architecture.

Call for Papers: Making the Multilateral Investment Court Beneficial for Sub-Saharan Africa

The international adjudication of investor-state disputes is at a crossroads. Since 2017, negotiations have been underway at UNCITRAL for the reform of the current system of dispute settlement, what is typically called ISDS. Different visions of the reformed version of ISDS have emerged. At one end of the reform pendulum is systemic reform, at the other end there is the option of incremental reform, while in the middle there is an option of a combination between incremental reform and systemic reform. Finally, there is an option to move beyond reform and dismantle ISDS.

The Promise Institute for Human Rights at UCLA Launches Race and Human Rights Reimagined Initiative

The Promise Institute for Human Rights is proud to be at the forefront of critical thinking about the role of human rights in achieving racial justice and equality. Bringing together our expertise in human rights, Critical Race Theory, and Third World Approaches to International Law, we strive to uncover how race and empire operate within the international human rights system, while exploring the potential of law to dismantle national and trans-national structures of racial and colonial subordination.

Roundtable Webinar Invitation: Trade and Distribution

This roundtable will ask what insights or productive questions can be advanced to make sense of the changing ground in international economic law, and whether these ongoing shifts can be leveraged towards progressive and equitable distributive outcomes. Our areas of inquiry include: the US and domestic trade policy; developing countries' concerns vis-à-vis global distribution; distributional consequences within developing countries; and effects of race and gender.