Third World Approaches to International Law

Delocalized Justice: The Delocalization of Corporate Accountability for Human Rights Violations Originating in Africa

This symposium aims to encourage a more systematic and critical scholarly engagement with the delocalization of justice in BHR cases involving harms suffered in African states, and the Global South more broadly. It is our contention that until now, with some notable exceptions, scholarly debates in the BHR sphere have insufficiently focused on the justification for, effectiveness of, and alternatives to this uprooting strategy. Yet, this delocalization lies at the heart of many legal processes and regulatory mechanisms aimed at delivering justice (or corporate accountability) in the Global North for harms that occurred in the Global South. Interrogating this delocalization, and imagining alternative strategies that would enable local populations to gain greater agency through local political and legal processes, should be at the core of scholarship and activism in the BHR field.

Reflections on the 9th Afronomicslaw Academic Forum Guest Lecture Delivered by Harrison Mbori and John Nyanje

The lecture was fascinating because it provided various ways of moving forward. These include the questioning of international law as amateurs, the need to produce ‘African’ international law, and the duty we have in promoting and protecting our epistemic locations.

Research Symposium – “International Law 'in the Palm of our Hand’: Reading between the Lines of Brazilian International Law Textbooks.”

The “Research Symposium” is an initiative of the ILA-Brazil International Law Agendas blog to stimulate the debate on ideas that emerge from research projects in international law in Brazilian law schools. In this inaugural symposium, we present the research project “International law 'in the palm of our hand’: reading between the lines of Brazilian International Law textbooks.”

Afronomicslaw.org Academic Forum Guest Lecture Series: A Conversation around "The Promise of International Law: A Third World View?"

April 22, 2021

The Afronomicslaw.org Academic Forum invites you to join their next guest lecture series.

Guest Speaker:

Harrison Mbori, Research Fellow at Max Planck Institute Luxemburg for International, European and Regulatory Procedural Law

John Nyanje, International Lawyer, Kenya and Switzerland

Book Review: The Performance of Africa's International Courts: Using Litigation for Political, Legal and Social Change

Even though Africa has proven to be a fertile ground for testing international legal regimes, most scholarly accounts remain pessimistic in assessing these experiments. This book seeks to counter these depictions in a manner consistent with epistemologies of the Global South - arguing that theories and concepts developed in the Global North do not transfer with ease to other regional settings and prompts scholars to identify alternative ways of knowing

International Investment Law: National, Regional and Global Perspectives Book Symposium

I am delighted to present this symposium for my textbook entitled: International Investment Law: National, Regional and Global Perspectives (Wolf Legal Publishers, Nijmegen, the Netherlands: 2020). The textbook could not have come at a better time given the compelling need for scholars from the Global South, particularly Africa, to contribute to international investment law scholarship to help reshape and redefine international investment law for the mutual advantages of foreign investors/enterprises and the host States.

International Women's Day: In Conversation with Dr Sara Seck

To mark the 2021 International Women’s Day themed #Choose to Challenge, Afronomicslaw.org celebrates Dr Sara Seck’s brilliant contributions to International Law. Dr Seck is an Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Research at Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University.

Afronomicslaw Symposium: Nigeria and International Law: Past, Present and the Future - Call for Blogs

We invite scholarly interventions, from established, mid-career, young faculty, doctoral candidates and practitioners to analyse Nigeria’s engagement with the scholarship and praxis of international law.

Introduction to the Book: ‘The Fair and Equitable Treatment (FET) Standard in International Investment Arbitration: Developing Countries in Context’ (Springer, 2018)

The overarching argument made in the book is that there is a pressing need to reconceptualize the interpretation of the FET standard, taking into account the particular developmental circumstances of the developing countries in investor-State disputes. The book explores these challenges and issues that the developing countries face arising from overly broad interpretations of the FET standard.

Reflections on the 6th Afronomicslaw Academic Forum Guest Lecture delivered by Professor Mohsen al Attar

This post-lecture reflection captures critical discussions from the 6th guest lecture of the Academic Forum delivered by Professor Mohsen al Attar, Dean of the University of West Indies Law School. The theme of the guest lecture was 'Decolonisation of International Economic Law'. Focusing on five tenets - capitalism, epistemology/knowledge, colonialism, international law and political economy – which Professor Mohsen used as a frame to foreground his analysis, this piece, explores the prospects and challenges of decolonising International Economic Law. In keeping with the Academic Forum's focus, it is argued that uncritical/Eurocentric approaches to teaching IEL in African universities hamper efforts to decolonise our epistemologies. In exploring alternate ways to re-frame, the global economic order, this piece also highlights the idea of 'social justice' as a valuable metric of development, i.e. socio-economic equity that raises the standard of living to the greatest extent relative to each of our circumstances.